Tagging and the GNOME Desktop

Just a little preview. It’s not done yet, but will be shortly. What you see below is a small python module, a useful command line utility (well, that’s not shown, but if you check the gallery these are in there will be a full-size screenshot showing one), and plugins for Nautilus, GNOME-VFS, and Deskbar. There are plans for Beagle support in the near future, and to make the system more robust.

Stay tuned. There should be a release soon.

Tags in Nautilus lists

Tags in Nautilus lists

tags URI

Deskbar Integration 1

Deskbar Integration 2

Chippy’s first Boston trip

I’m finally heading to the Boston GNOME Summit! I’ve wanted to go for years, and people have asked me to attend, but due to school and such it was just never possible. However, this year VMware is sending a few of us to go. Alex Graveley, Philip Langdale, my girlfriend Jamie, and myself are all going, and will be there Friday night.

We might give a small talk on our experience in integrating our product with the GNOME desktop, and I’ve been asked by a few people to give a quick talk and demo of Galago with Tomboy, Beagle, Gaim and Evolution integration (and hopefully Gossip at that point too).

I look forward to going and meeting all these great people who I’ve only talked to through IRC and e-mail. It should be a fun weekend.

I can’t see.

Let there be light!

Now then, I’d like to say that I applaud bringing awareness to this issue, but we’re preaching to the choire. Preventing users from getting support and reading gnome.org and Planet GNOME will only serve to piss off the users. They might read the message, but I doubt they’d be any more receptive to it. Everyone who does care probably already knows about it.

The message at the top is good, and we should draw attention to it, but please, let’s let people actually see the sites. This does not look professional.

I’d like to point out that there are some good blog entries about this subject on Planet GNOME that people are missing due to the blackout.

And with that…

Back to the dark ages!

(This is directed to Planet GNOME. It doesn’t make sense anywhere else.)

Various Updates

So a few things have taken place lately, and I haven’t blogged about them because I’m just really busy (or lazy, depending).

Galago and the fd.o desktop notifications reference implementation that Mike Hearn and I wrote have been proposed for GNOME 2.10. As I’m still new to this whole process, I don’t know exactly what to expect, but time will tell.

For the first time in a long time, I actually wrote up birthday and Christmas wishlists, as I usually get asked by everybody every year. I figured I might as well post them, as I find it useful to look at other people’s for ideas. I have them on Amazon, ThinkGeek, and NewEgg.com.

At sri’s constant urging (it’s appreciated!) I’ve been working on a couple of articles for GNOME Journal. Hopefully I’ll actually be happy enough with one of these and have it finished by tomorrow.

And I guess that’s it for now.

Productivity Shattered!

I was given an invite to Orkut yesterday. For those of you who don’t know what Orkut is, get out from under your rock 🙂 It’s a rather interesting waste of time, and it’s delayed a lot of my development. I think I’ll be getting back to that in a few minutes though. Just.. just five more minutes.. then I’ll code.. Promise.

My copy of Dream Theater – Change of Seasons and Metropolis 2000: Scenes From New York came yesterday, and I spent the better part of today watching/listening to them. Excellent stuff.

While on the topic of that, it’d be nice to see some kind of CD ripper integration in Nautilus. Right-click an audio CD and get a Rip To Music entry or something, which brings up a dialog allowing ripping to wav, mp3, ogg, flac, etc. Maybe multiple ones at once? I wouldn’t mind flac and ogg copies. For now though, Grip is my friend.

Another Sad Day

The first news I read when I woke up was the passing of Mark Finlay. Unfortunately for me, like Ettore and Chema, I didn’t know him personally or talked to him online, but I have kept up with his blog. I had respect for him. He seemed like a really good guy, something that is backed up by all the people praising him on Planet GNOME.

I’d like to take a moment and say thank you to all of the people who bring what I use every day to reality, keep it maintained, and provide support for it. They don’t have to. None of us do, and I know open source developers see “Why haven’t you fixed my bug yet?” more often than “Thank you.” To any users of any software reading this, thank your developers. It’ll make their day, and sometimes it helps to be reminded that what they’re doing is wanted, and you never know how long they’ll be around…

Good bye Mark. Thank you.