Weird bugs: Django, timezones, and importing from eggs

Every so often you hit a bug that makes you question your sanity. The past several days have been spent chasing one of the more confusing ones I’ve seen in a long time.

Review Board 1.7 added the ability to set the server-wide timezone. During development, we found problems using SSH with a non-default timezone. This only happened when updating os.environ[‘TZ’] to something other than our default of UTC. We’d see the SSH process (rbssh, our wrapper for SSH communication) break due to an EOF on stdin and stdout, and then we’d see the development server reload itself.

Odd.

Since this originated with a Subversion repository, I first suspected libsvn. I spent some time going through their code to see if a timezone update would break something. Perhaps timeout logic. That didn’t turn up anything interesting, but I couldn’t rule it out.

Other candidates for suspicion were rbssh itself, paramiko (the SSH library), Django, and the trickster god Loki. We just had too many moving pieces to know for sure.

So I wrote a little script to get in-between a calling process and another process and log all communication between them. I tested this with rbssh and with plain ol’ ssh. rbssh was the only one that broke. Strange, since it wasn’t doing anything obviously wrong, and it worked with the default timezone. Unless it was Paramiko somehow…

For the heck of it, I tried copying some of rbssh’s imports into this new script. Ah-ha! It dropped its streams when importing Paramiko, same as rbssh. Interesting. Time to dig into that code.

The base paramiko module imports a couple dozen other modules, so I started by narrowing it down and reducing imports until I found the common one that breaks things. Well that turned out to be a module that imported Crypto.Random. Replacing the paramiko import in my wrapper with Crypto.Random verified that that was the culprit.

Getting closer…

I rinsed and repeated with Crypto.Random, digging through the code and seeing what could have broken. Hmm, that code’s pretty straight-forward, but there are some native libraries in there. Well, all this is in a .egg file (not an extracted .egg directory), making it hard to look through, so I extracted it and replaced it with a .egg directory.

Woah! The problem went away!

I glance at the clock. 3AM. I’m not sure I can trust what I’m seeing anymore. Crypto.Random breaks rbssh, but only when installed as a .egg file and not a .egg directory. That made no sense, but I figured I’d deal with it in the morning.

My dreams that night were filled with people wearing “stdin” and “stdout” labels on their foreheads, not at all getting along.

Today, I considered just ripping out timezone support. I didn’t know what else to do. Though, since I’m apparently a bit of a masochist, I decided to look into this just a little bit more. And finally struck gold.

With my Django development server running, I opened up a separate, plain Python shell. In it, I typed “import Crypto.Random”. And suddenly saw my development server reload.

How could that happen, I wondered. I tried it again. Same result. And then… lightbulb!

Django reloads the dev server when modules change. Crypto is a self-contained .egg file with native files that must be extracted and added to the module path. Causing Django to reload. Causing it to drop the spawned rbssh process. Causing the streams to disconnect. Ah-ha. This had to be it.

One last piece of the puzzle. The timezone change.

I quickly located their autoreload code and pulled it up. Yep, it’s comparing modified timestamps. We have two processes with two different ideas of what the current timezone is (one UTC, one US/Pacific, in my case), meaning when rbssh launched and imported Crypto, we’d get a bunch of files extracted with US/Pacific-based timestamps and not UTC, triggering the autoreload.

Now that the world makes sense again, I can finally fix the problem!

All told, that was about 4 or 5 days of debugging. Certainly not the longest debugging session I’ve had, but easily one of the more confusing ones in a while. Yet in the end, it’s almost obvious.

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